Tag Archives: Devil’s Hole State Park

2chicksNiagara ~One cat’s opinion…

One cat’s opinion? Misha wanted to remind you that no matter the season, Niagara is a great place to visit, love and live! Autumn’s just around the corner, so be a cool cat and plan your trip ahead.

DSC00070

The 2chicks family has been in the midst of a move, so less publishing this summer, but Misha was tired of just hanging around and had to get her two cents in! Her trip’s already in the bag. 😉

#ThrowbackThursday #SherrieRobinsArt #Niagara #Autumnscoming

Tweaterpated at Twitter

2chicks2go Facebook

Sherrie Robins’ Art Facebook

Sherrie Robins’ Art Fine Art America (Purchase of art, available here. *Requests taken).

2chicks2go Pinterest

 

 

 

2chicks Niagara ~ Gorgeous Gorge

For the Beauty of the Earth.

069.jpg-3

The wind curves ’round the bend,

The Hawk and eagle glide on by,

The water rushes down below,

My heart it soars, touching the sky.

Sherrie Robins

 

#ForBeautySake #NiagaraGorge #NiagaraRiver #NiagaraFalls #SherrieRobinsArt
#2chicks2go #WhirlpoolStatePark #DevilsHole #IloveNewYork

The Gorgeous Niagara Gorge

11046516_10156195161420301_7853473475077887808_n.jpg-2

Hello, friends, it’s Autumn in Niagara. The leaves have reached their peak in beauty, and we’d love to share them with you! We start our autumnal journey at the stairs that lead down to the gorge, by Devil’s Hole Park. Currently it’s a bit of a treacherous walk, but they have plans to fix them in the near future. (Notice that we hop up and down the gorge a few times, based on the order of our photos!)

 

12190037_10156195161710301_1594033278757869300_n.jpg-1

One of our favorite trees along the path at the top of the gorge.

 

12063772_10156195163220301_4859751769847945896_n.jpg-1

Such beautiful, rich colors. Don’t get to close to the raging waters!

 

12039710_10156195163945301_8378552875763198314_n.jpg-2

A blanket of leaves cover the ground along the trail, on the banks of the Niagara.

 

12187673_10156195162705301_4588800295986207668_n.jpg-2

A bird’s eye view of the Niagara Gorge. Looking across toward the Canadian side of the river, the colors are so vibrant.

 

12036532_10156195163715301_4937223852159043971_n.jpg-2

After our Bird’s eye view, we dive back down for a closer look at the water!

 

DSC01728.jpg-1

We pop over to the Niagara Falls Discovery Center, where there is easier access down to the gorge. An elevator will take you to the bottom (Open from Spring through October 31st).

http://www.niagarafallsstatepark.com/discovery-center.aspx

DSC01733.jpg-1

The familiar turquoise waters of the Niagara.

 

DSC01712

A patchwork quilt of orange, gold, yellow, red and green.

 

DSC01744.jpg-1

An adventurer brought their bike down the elevator, and went for a walk. Thank you for leaving it to ‘pose’ for the picture. 😉

 

DSC01737.jpg-2

The Rainbow Bridge connecting two countries, and a part of the Horseshoe Falls too.

 

DSC01696.jpg-1

Niagara Falls, Ontario.

 

Fall really is one of the best times to visit Niagara; the tourist population and the heat is down, and the beauty is up. So if you’re an adventurous person and you like to hike, the stairs are for you. But if you prefer beauty without all of the hard work, you can enjoy it just as much using the elevator.

So whatever season you choose to visit, you’re always welcome.

The Parks of Niagara – Part I

069.jpg-3
Devil’s Hole State Park

The Niagara region is rife with vegetation and life. It’s beaming with beauty and verdancy.  So much is accessible to the public for viewing, some in a natural state and some in more manicured park lands.

Here is a quick overview of a few of the Parks Niagara has to offer, featuring Devil’s Hole, Whirlpool State Park and Niagara Reservation State Park.

Devil’s Hole State Park has been a great source of Inspiration for our family. With it’s changing moods, with the seasons, diverse paths and trails, it seems to always present something for each of our tastes. Mom likes the above trail and the creative opportunities a stroll affords. The rest of the family likes the hiking down the cliff to the water’s edge: destination ‘wild water’ and unique rock formations.

157-1-2-3-4

 

DSC01899.jpg-2

 

DSC01911.jpg-2

No pictures of the lower path. Sorry. Everyone was too busy having fun! You’ll just have to come and experience it for yourselves.

DSC01903.JPG-1

And on a practical note, there are picnic tables, so bring a lunch.

Whirlpool State Park and Devil’s Hole are ‘next door’ to one another and accessible via a trail that runs along the top of the gorge. It is not a difficult connection, but it is not easy either. If you are looking for an easy walk, the Devil’s Hole trail is the easiest. Whirlpool’s has a hill you need to navigate and the connection between the parks has a stony and hilly trail.

October 25, 2012. Whirlpool State Park. A special treat of 78 degrees!d
Whirlpool State Park

Whirlpool Park has a lovely view of the Whirlpool, below on the Niagara River and of the Aero car that crosses the gorge, over the Whirlpool, from Canada to Canada.

Lovely stone building and look-out.
Lovely stone building and look-out.

We would be remiss if we did not turn the spotlight toward Niagara Reservation State Park. A constant beauty, showcasing the Falls, renowned world over, this Park is the number one destination of all tourists visiting from across the globe. A four-season reservation, no room for any hesitation, this is the ultimate destination! 😉

DSC00326-1
Niagara Reservation State Park – America’s oldest State Park.
10654042_290646324471984_764423617_n-1-2
The water crashing on the rocks below. Always magnificent.
10660631_290646307805319_1380812529_n-1-2
On Luna Island, between the Bridal Veil and American Falls…up close and personal.
DSC00354-1
In the heart of the City, Niagara rings true with paths and walkways, assured of natural beauty.
DSCF3232
You never know what you’ll find around the corner at Reservation: Buffalo Philharmonic performs.

 

 

 

The Devil’s Hole Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary

Image

The Devil’s Hole State Park is 42 acres of both wooded and cleared land along the Niagara River gorge, adjacent to the Whirlpool State Park. The park has a charming trail along the top of the ridge, providing beautiful scenery, including a view of both the American and Canadian Power vistas, which are both accessible to the public. http://www.nypa.gov/vc/niagara.htm and http://www.niagaraparks.com/niagara-falls-attractions/sir-adam-beck.html   If you descend one of the walkways down to the river, you will be presented with a wild river, full of torrential rapids. There are also trails down below.* Beware this is a dangerous area and to enter the water is deadly. Also, the trails are steep and the footing can be treacherous. http://www.everytrail.com/best/hiking-buffalo-new-york.

Image
The Niagara area and beyond are very historical and played a large role in the establishment of the United States as we know it.

Yesterday marked the memorial of the 250th year since the Seneca Native Americans ambushed the British at Devil’s Hole.  http://niagara-gazette.com/communities/x312428187/Devils-Holes-marking-250th-anniversary-on-weekend.

To commemorate the Anniversary, a re-enactment of the events was held. The upper trail is most often used by tourists, joggers and dog walkers, but yesterday, that wasn’t the case; horses and wagons appeared in the normally quiet park. True to period costumes for the soldiers, Native American garb for the Native Americans, and rifle firing over the gorge were the order of the day. There were also walking tours available, and we took one, in which the speakers in essence said the following;

*Warning: the italicized writing is HISTORY. We like it. Not everyone does. We tried to make it interesting, but to each their own…

In 1763 the British held Fort Niagara, after the displaced French, and the Native tribes of the area were unhappy about it. Supplies played a vital part in why the Fort was needed and in supplying Detroit further on down the line.

Now here’s the rub. The Seneca had held this trade route for many years and considered it their right; after all, it was their land and livelihood. They had tolerated the newcomers, having found a useful niche, of sorts, but when the British cut them out of the equation, a smoldering resentment erupted into the ambush at Devil’s hole. About 400 Seneca were waiting for the convoy and when all was said and done around a hundred men were killed, many scalped and found in the river, having fallen the height of the gorge down to the river below. The headmaster survived, having escaped back to Fort Schlosser, up river, above the Falls and lived to tell about it. http://dmna.ny.gov/forts/fortsQ_S/schlosserFort.htm.

Image

Men representing the 46th Regiment Grenadiers dressed for their role in authentic period costume, tall hats and all. Chris is a regular participant in re-enactments, and a Western New Yorker. We commented on his “chapeau” and its unusual shape and height and told him it reminded us of a German topper. He answered, saying the Germans had also used them and that “it was designed to intimidate by adding height” to the often already taller than average Grenadiers. He also said how another advantage was when the Grenadiers, (who used to throw grenades), found that when they did so, sometimes their hats would catch on fire, and that the  taller hats would not! (At least that’s what Chris said)… Eventually these same hats morphed into the bearskin hats we know and love today as those worn by the Queen’s Guards displaying them in front of Buckingham Palace. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bearskin Chris kindly posed for this photo; a fine looking specimen, at that.

Image

We spoke with Al Parker, also known as Ho/yen/dah/onh who was one of the Seneca representatives. He was sure to tell us that his native name means “He got it”, which we found amusing! Parker felt the main thing that came out of this historic event was the treaty between the English and the Seneca Nations. Parker is on the Board of Directors at Old Fort Niagara and is involved in the French and Indian War re-enactment held there each July, http://militaryhistorynow.com/2013/07/08/living-history-french-indian-war-comes-alive-at-fort-niagara/ He also told us that some of his fellow participants at this event were regular re-enactors who act in movies as well! Pretty cool.

Image